Home » Religion, Interpretation and Diversity of Belief: The Framework Model from Kant to Durkheim to Davidson by Terry F. Godlove, Jr.
Religion, Interpretation and Diversity of Belief: The Framework Model from Kant to Durkheim to Davidson Terry F. Godlove, Jr.

Religion, Interpretation and Diversity of Belief: The Framework Model from Kant to Durkheim to Davidson

Terry F. Godlove, Jr.

Published July 28th 1989
ISBN : 9780521361798
Hardcover
207 pages
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 About the Book 

Different religious traditions offer apparently very different pictures of the world. How are we to make sense of this radical diversity of religious belief? In this book, Professor Godlove argues that religions are alternative conceptual frameworks,MoreDifferent religious traditions offer apparently very different pictures of the world. How are we to make sense of this radical diversity of religious belief? In this book, Professor Godlove argues that religions are alternative conceptual frameworks, the categories of which organise experience in diverse ways. He traces the history of this idea from Kant to Durkheim, and then proceeds to discuss two constraints on the diversity of all human judgment and belief: first that human experience is made possible by shared, a priori rules, and second, that as language-users we must presuppose that we hold the vast bulk of our beliefs in common. Given these unavoidable constraints, it is clear how religions may offer encompassing symbolic systems that often diverge dramatically from one another. An original and brilliant critique of Durkheim and Kant from within the framework of Davidsons semantic theory. This book is required reading for anyone interested in the academic study of religion, and the problems of relativism and the diversity of belief. -- Hans H. Penner, Dartmouth CollegeDifferent religious traditions offer apparently very different pictures of the world. How are we to make sense of this radical diversity of religious belief? In this book, Professor Godlove argues that religions are alternative conceptual frameworks, the categories of which organise experience in diverse ways. He traces the history of this idea from Kant to Durkheim, and then proceeds to discuss two constraints on the diversity of all human judgment and belief: first that human experience is made possible by shared, a priori rules, and second, that as language-users we must presuppose that we hold the vast bulk of our beliefs in common. Given these unavoidable constraints, it is clear how religions may offer encompassing symbolic systems that often diverge dramatically from one another. An original and brilliant critique of Durkheim and Kant from within the framework of Davidsons semantic theory. This book is required reading for anyone interested in the academic study of religion, and the problems of relativism and the diversity of belief. -- Hans H. Penner, Dartmouth College